Descendants of Samual Jenkins

 

Generation No. 1

1. SAMUAL2 JENKINS (JONAS1) was born Abt. 1735 in Orange County, Virginia, and died Abt. 1796 in Shenandoah County, Virginia. He married JANE 1756 in Shenandoah County, Virginia. She was born 1742 in Virginia, and died 1802 in Shenandoah County, Virginia.

Notes for SAMUAL JENKINS:

The following genealogy begins in 1740 with Samuel Jenkins of Shenandoah County, Virginia. Records have not been found to secure an earlier genealogy. However, it is apparent that Samuel's father most probably was one Jonas Jenkins, recorded living in 1733 east of the Blue Ridge at the Great Mountain in the Rapidan Valley. (Virginia Magazine of History and Biography; v. 13, p. 366)

This record concerns a road being created in Spotsylvania (now Culpepper) County along the Rapidan River. In that year it was extended across the Blue Ridge at Swift Run Gap, thereby opening the Shenandoah Valley for forwarding migration. At this time the frontier line was at the eastern base of the Blue Ridge. Years later, Samuel would have followed this route through Swift Run Gap to the new frontier along the Shenandoah River.

It seems our first generation in America must have immigrated to the colony of Virginia during the large-scale Scotch-Irish emigration of the later 1600s. Our Jenkinses would have likely arrived through the Chesapeake Bay and migrated westward along the Rappahannock River. Generations pioneered the way to the Blue Ridge and the Shenandoah Valley, where the trend of migration turned to the south.

Samuel Jenkins was born about 1735 in Orange (now Culpepper)County, Virginia where he grew to manhood in the Rapidan Valley. He married circa 1756, a woman known to us only by her given name, Jane. Jane has not been fully identified. They were married sometime about 1758 judging from the apparent birthdates of their children. They had a family of at least 10 children, all seemingly born and raised in Spotsylvania and Shenandoah Counties, Virginia.

A soldier in the War of the Revolution, Samuel Jenkins served in the infantry within the Virginia Continental Army. His military record consists only of his name being listed in a register of certificates for payment of services rendered. His firstborn son, Josiah Jenkins, also appears in the pay register and his surviving military record is complete. It is most probable father and son served together. Josiah Jenkins enlisted in Captain Thomas West' Company, 10th Virginia Continental Regiment (commanded by Major Samuel Hawes.) He was mustered into service on November 18, 1776, and was last on the rolls on April 3, 1778 at Valley Forge in a hospital.

At the time of his service in the war, Samuel Jenkins was a resident of Dunmore (name changed to Shenandoah) County, Virginia. On April 6, 1773, he was granted by patent 145 acres near the head of Cedar Creek on Sugar Tree Hill. On August 30, 1778, He was granted an additional 125 acres on Cedar Creek. In 1778, Josiah Jenkins purchased 127 acres near the head of Cedar Creek.

Samuel Jenkins family first appears on the 1780 census of Shendoah County. Samuel and Jane were pioneers in the Massanuten Valley of Shenandoah Count. By the time of the Revolution, this region west of the Blue Ridge was still largely in the possession of Indians although the Scotch-Irish had gained a strong foothold.

Samuel Jenkins died probably at the beginning of 1796, as his will was proved on January 12, of the year. His will ordered to be certified in Shenandoah County Order Book 1795-1798, p. 124, does not survive on record in the county will book. An inventory and apprisement of his personel estate remains on record. (The above information was taken from a book compiled by Gary Claude Jenkins

Library of Congress Catalogue Card Number 82-0094133 Copyright l983)

According to Mr. Lucius Harvey, Samuel Jenkins, the Revolutionist, served in the infrantry of the Virginia Continental Line. His military record (which ordinarily includes the regiment and date enlisted) contains only a certificate of payment for services rendered. This was paid on August 27, 1783 following an act of Congress. (Military record per National Archives, Card #39168921)

Children of SAMUAL JENKINS and JANE are:

i. JOSIAH3 JENKINS, b. 1758, Shenandoah County, Virginia; m. ANN.

Notes for JOSIAH JENKINS:

It is believed that Josiah was the first born in the family of Samual and Jane Jenkins. He most lkely was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia, where he served in the Virginia Militia during the Revolutionary War as did his father, Samuel. The mother's full-name is unknown.

ii. ANN JENKINS, b. 1765; m. ALEX SPADEN, 19 December 1787.

iii. JANE JENKINS, b. 1767; m. ANDREW WATT, 27 October 1789.

iv. ELIZABETH JENKINS, b. 1769; m. ROBERT ANDERSON, 26 October 1795.

2. v. JONAS TOLIVER JENKINS, SR., b. 1772, Shenandoah County, Virginia; d. 1856, Bryson City, Charlestown Township Swain County, North Carolina.

vi. JAMES JENKINS, b. 1774; m. ELIZABETH PARKS, 28 February 1798.

vii. THOMAS JENKINS, b. 1776; m. MARGARET FINLEY, 20 December 1798.

viii. SARAH JENKINS, b. 1778; m. THOMAS MCGRAW, 12 May 1799.

ix. EPHRAIM JENKINS, b. 1780.

3. x. ENOCH K. JENKINS, b. 1782.

 

Generation No. 2

2. JONAS TOLIVER3 JENKINS, SR. (SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 1772 in Shenandoah County, Virginia, and died 1856 in Bryson City, Charlestown Township Swain County, North Carolina. He met (1) JANE (JEANIE) BRICKEY, daughter of JOHN BRICKEY and MARY GARNER. She was born 1772, and died in Cocke County, Tennessee. He met (2) MARY ELIZABETH (BETSY) BRICKEY Bef. 9 January 1798 in Woodstock, Shenandoah County, Virginia, daughter of JEANIE BRICKEY. She was born 17 July 1774 in Botetourt County, Virginia, and died January 1828. He married (3) ANN (POLLY) WILLIAMS 9 January 1798 in Woodstock, Shenandoah County, Virginia. She was born 1774 in Shenandoah County, Virginia, and died Aft. 1850 in Macon County, North Carolina.

Notes for JONAS TOLIVER JENKINS, SR.:

White settlement in areas lying along the Oconaluftee and Tukaseegee Rivers, within the borders of present Swain Count, began soon after the Cherokee Indian cessation of 1798. The remainder of the land now belonging to Swain County was surrendered by the Cherokees in the Treaty of February 27, 1819. However, it was not until the North Carolina General Assembly on March, 1871 was held that an act was passed by the state legislature, ratifying Swain as a new county. Swain was formed from Jackson and Macon Counties. It was named in honor of David L. Swain, Governor of North Carolina and resident of the University of North Carolina. It is the western section of the state and is bounded by the state of Tennessee and Haywood, Jackson, Macon and Graham Counties in North Carolina. The present land area if 525.66 square miles and th 1990 population was 11,268. The first court was ordered to be held at Cold Spring Meeting House. Special commissioners were named to select a site for the courthouse, provided all the commissioners could agree on a certain place. If they could not agree, the county commissioners were to submit the question of selecting a place to the voters. The county commissioners were to lay out a town by the name of Charleston which was to be the county seat. In 1889, the name Charleston was changed to Bryson City in honor of Colonel Thad Dillard Byrson. Bryson City is the current county seat. Swain County, North Carolina was the birth place of my father, William Joseph Welch, October 20, 1883. (from William R. Welch, 9/2002)

Almost nothing is known of the early life of Jonas except that he was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia of Welsh and Scotch-Irish heritage. Jonas had red hair, blue eyes, and a bad temper

Jonas was married to Polly Williams, but fathered children with Jeannie BRICKEY and her daughter Elizabeth "Betsy" BRICKEY. Jonas ran a legal distillery of whiskey and brandy, and the BRICKEY ladies were employees of his. Betsy died at the birth of her son, Peter, in 1828.

The marriage on January 9, 1798 to Polly Ann was signed by Jane Jenkins, Ann's guardian. It may be assumed that her parents were dead by the time of their marriage because the marriage bond names Jane Jenkins as guardian in the place of Ann's parent's name. Upon their union Jonas and Ann migrated to East Tennessee, possibly settling in Cocke County. Shortly after marrying, Jonas and Polly migrated to East Tennessee where remained until after 1810.

During the War of 1812, Jonas Jenkins enlisted in James Allen's Company, Col. Bunch's Regiment of the East Tennessee Militia. He was mustered into service at Knoxville on January 10, 1814, however on the 27th of the month he was furloughed due to sickness and did not return to duty.

Afterwards, Jonas returned with his family to Shenandoah County and remained until 1821. Within this year they again journeyed south and settled this time on the other side of the Great Smoky Mountains in Haywood County, North Carolina. He purchased in 1821, l50 acres on Shoal Creek, a tributary of Soco Creek. His tracts, on the Indian line, was in the realm relinquished by the Cherokee government two years earlier in the Treaty of 1819. Jonas was situated as a neighbor among the Indians who chose to remain in the valley rather than remove to the receded Cherokee territory.

Jonas Jenkins, Sr. first appears in Haywood County, North Carolina about 1823 and was settled in Soco Valley by 1828. In that year, he bought a one-hundred acre track of land on the north side of Soco Creek. Later in 1828, he bought several tracks of land on the south side of the creek from Abraham Enloe, the man some historians claim is the actual father of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. Jonas and his three sons owned over a thousand acres of land along Soco Creek. Over one-hundred and fifty years later, the area north of the creek is still recorded on the U.S. Geological Survey maps as Jenkins Ridge.

In 1830, Jonas Jenkins was granted by patent 100 acres on Soco Creek and soon after followed additional grants of land on both sides of Soco. His sons, Nathan, Jonas Jr. and John, purchased adjoining tracts until their farms together exceeded a thousand acres. Jonas was active in the county's civic concerns, being summoned numerous times through the years to serve jury duty at

Waynesville; and to aid in the surveying and opening of roads. One of many such court assignments appears to be work on what is now Highway 19.

Ordered by court that Jonas Jenkins be overseer of the public road Top of the mountain

from the Soco Creek to Jonas Jenkins' and that all the working hands who live on

Soco Creek and its waters from the mouth of Swearing Jim Mill Creek including both forks

and all their waters work under said overseer. 5th October 1826. --Minutes of Haywood County

Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Book 3, p. 110.

A peculiar domestic situation developed with Jonas while living in Soco Valley. Having received a licence from the county to sell Spiritous Liquors at his dwelling house, he allowed a woman by the name of Jane or Jennie Brickey to live at his still house and work for him. By her he bore two sons; and sired one son by her daughter, Elizabeth (Betsy). Elizabeth Brickey died after delivering her child. Jane Brickey took charge of him with her own two sons until in a matter of years an apparent confrontation drove her away. Her eldest son, Thomas, is reported to have related in late age how his mother told him she was going to hunt the cows on the mountain when she was last seen. He said she was wiping her eyes with her apron as she went and she repeatedly turned and looked back on them.

Jonas and his three sons (Nathan, Jonas, Jr. & John) eventually owned over a thousand acres of land along Soco Creek. Over one hundred and seventy years later the area north of the creek is still recorded on U. S. Geological Survey maps as Jenkins Ridge.

In 1838, Jonas Jenkins sold his remaining tracts on Soco Creek to William H. Thomas, agent for the Qualla Cherokees, who supposedly was buying land for the Indians allowed to remain during the 1838, removal of the Cherokee Nation. The family's farms, two miles west of Quallatown, eventually reverted back to the Cherokees after 1870, with the establishment of the Qualla Boundary. Their former holdings left a legacy on the land with Jenkins Creek, Jenkins Divide (or ridge), and Jonas' Fields.

Moving a few miles west in 1838, Jonas and his sons settled on the Tuckasegee River at the present Jenkins Branch, one mile west of what is now Bryson City. In 1840, Jonas entered a grant for one hundred acres on the south bank of the river along the boundary of the former Big Bear Reservation in Macon (now Swain) County. In time he accumulated about five hundred acres in this vicinity. Jonas Jenkins remained on record until 1856 when he sold some of his tracts to his sons, Charles and Thomas. He died in that year or shortly afterwards, about the age of 84. It is believed he and his wife Polly are buried in the Henry Jenkins Cemetery located on a hilltop west of Jenkins Branch on the north side of Highway 19.

References: Age and birthplace per 1850 Census Macon Co. NC, p. 348; B.M. Ashby, "Shenandoah County Virginia Marriage Bonds"; military service per N/A M602 Roll 110; Confederate service per N/A

Record Group 109; Census: 1820 Shenandoah Co, VVA, p. 28; 1830 Haywood Co,NC p.380; 1840 Macon Co. p. 156; 1850 Macon Co. p. 348.

JENKINS- Gary Claude Jenkins, l983 Library of Congress Catalogue Card Number 82-094133

The above is attributed to the great research of Gary Jenkins of Ft. Oglethorpe, GA.

North Carolina Volunteers participating in the Indian Removal: Thomas Angel Company - Jonas Jenkins

More About JONAS TOLIVER JENKINS, SR.:

Burial: Swain County, North Carolina, Arlington Cemetery

Notes for JANE (JEANIE) BRICKEY:

The Brickey family may have been Huguenot in origin. It is said that they descended from one John Brickey who emigrated from France in 1680.

Notes for ANN (POLLY) WILLIAMS:

Ann Williams marriage bond was signed by Jane Jenkins, who was her guradian at the time.

Children of JONAS JENKINS and JANE BRICKEY are:

4. i. THOMAS4 JENKINS, b. 9 December 1826, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. Aft. 1888, Graham County, North Carolina.

5. ii. CHARLES (DOCK) JENKINS, b. 16 May 1829, Macon County, North Carolina; d. 20 January 1915, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina.

Child of JONAS JENKINS and MARY BRICKEY is:

6. iii. PETER ANDREW4 JENKINS, b. 13 January 1828, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. 12 December 1912, Haywood County, North Carolina.

Children of JONAS JENKINS and ANN WILLIAMS are:

7. iv. NATHAN4 JENKINS, b. 1793, Tennessee; d. Aft. 1860, Jackson County, North Carolina.

v. MARY JENKINS, b. 10 February 1801, Scott County, Virginia.

8. vi. JONAS TOLIVER JENKINS, JR., b. 1803, East Tennessee; d. 17 April 1871, Cherokee County, North Carolina.

9. vii. JOHN S. JENKINS, b. 1805, Tennessee; d. 1874, Jackson County, North Carolina.

viii. ALPHA JENKINS, b. 22 March 1805, Newport, Cocke County, Tennessee.

ix. WASHINGTON CHARLES JENKINS, b. 1810, Haywood County, North Carolina.

x. WILLIAM N. JENKINS, b. 1812.

10. xi. NANCY JENKINS, b. 16 November 1814, Tennessee; d. 1925.

xii. JAMES JENKINS, b. November 1827, North Carolina.

xiii. ELIJAH J. (LIDGE) JENKINS, b. 1828, North Carolina.

 

3. ENOCH K.3 JENKINS (SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 1782. He married LUCY CAVE 2 January 1815.

Child of ENOCH JENKINS and LUCY CAVE is:

11. i. MATILDA4 JENKINS, b. 1811.

 

Generation No. 3

4. THOMAS4 JENKINS (JONAS TOLIVER3, SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 9 December 1826 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died Aft. 1888 in Graham County, North Carolina. He married ELIZABETH CLINE 12 September 1845 in Haywood County, North Carolina, daughter of MICHAEL CLINE and CATHERINE HYDE. She was born 28 October 1824 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died 25 April 1910.

Notes for THOMAS JENKINS:

Thomas served in the Civil was in the Confederate Army with Company A, Walker's Battalion, Thomas Legion. Settled at Jenkins Branch.

Children of THOMAS JENKINS and ELIZABETH CLINE are:

i. CHARLES5 JENKINS, b. 1846, Macon County, North Carolina.

ii. WILLIAM M. (DICK) JENKINS, b. 1848, Macon County, North Carolina; d. 10 March 1929, Swain County, North Carolina; m. ELIZABETH NICHOLS.

iii. NANCY E. JENKINS, b. Abt. 1853; m. JAMES UTE WIGGINS.

iv. MARY TELITHA JENKINS, b. 4 March 1853, Swain County, North Carolina; d. 2 August 1905, Blount County, Tennessee; m. JACOB MERLIN ROSE, 3 March 1873, Graham County, North Carolina; b. 4 July 1838, Cades Cove, Blount County, Tennessee; d. 21 April 1927, Tuckaleechee, Blount County, Tennessee.

More About MARY TELITHA JENKINS:

Burial: Blount County, Tennessee, Cloyd's Creek Cemetery

Notes for JACOB MERLIN ROSE:

Jacob was in the Civil War on the Confederate side. He enlisted on 25 June 1861 as a corporal in the 1st North Carolina Calvary. He enlisted at Buncombe County, North Carolina. He received a pension for his service. (Pension #S6141 Blount 1st NC Cav)

More About JACOB MERLIN ROSE:

Burial: Blount County, Tennessee, Tuckaleechee Chapel Cemetery

v. PHILIP JENKINS, b. 1854, Jackson County, North Carolina; m. NANCY STILES.

vi. SARAH (JENNIE) JENKINS, b. 1858, Jackson County, North Carolina; m. (1) JAMES CROSS PANTHER; b. 11 February 1856; m. (2) JUDSON ROSE, 5 August 1883.

vii. TENNESSEE ADALINE (PATTY) JENKINS, b. 15 January 1858, Swain County, North Carolina; d. 17 September 1931, Swain County, North Carolina; m. (1) JOE BIRCHFIELD; m. (2) GEORGE W. BRENDLE.

viii. ELIZABETH (BETSY) JENKINS, b. 7 December 1861, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. 12 December 1941; m. (1) SAMUEL TAYLOR BURNS, Bef. 1888; m. (2) WILLIAM COCHRAN, 20 May 1888, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1851.

Notes for ELIZABETH (BETSY) JENKINS:

Betsy is said to have been associated with or married to Samule Taylor Burns. Their son Roy did not go by Burns, but used the surname of Jenkins. Betsy is said to have later married William Cochran on 20 May 1888 in Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina.

More About ELIZABETH (BETSY) JENKINS:

Burial: Alarka, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina

Marriage Notes for ELIZABETH JENKINS and WILLIAM COCHRAN:

Marriage to William Cochran record listed: William Cochraham, 37 son of Matt and Myra Cochraham (both living) to Elisabeth Jenkins, 25, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Cline Jenkins (both living) by M. W. Warlick, Minister, 20 May 1888 at A. J. Jones. Witness A. Cochraham, J. D. Jenkins, Alfred Barker.

ix. JUSTIANA JENKINS, b. 1862; m. J. B. FULBRIGHT, 24 December 1880, Swain County, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1851.

Notes for J. B. FULBRIGHT:

J. B. Fulbright 29 of Jackson County, s/o Jacob W. (living) and Martha Fulbright (dead) Fulbright of Jackson County to Justiana Jenkins, 18, d/o Thomas and Elizabeth Jenkins (both living) of Swain County, 24 December 1880 by Mr. Battle, W. W. Battle, G. W. McConnell, Witnesses.

x. THOMAS M. JENKINS, b. Abt. 1869.

 

5. CHARLES (DOCK)4 JENKINS (JONAS TOLIVER3, SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 16 May 1829 in Macon County, North Carolina, and died 20 January 1915 in Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina. He married MARY (MAE) POLLY NICHOLS 19 May 1850 in Macon County, North Carolina, daughter of ALEXANDER NICHOLS and NANCY JENKINS. She was born 2 May 1834 in North Carolina, and died 8 December 1909 in Swain County, North Carolina.

Notes for CHARLES (DOCK) JENKINS:

Dock served during the Civil War in the Confederate Army, joining in 1861, Sgt. Company F, 29th Regiment, North Carolina. He enlisted August 31, 1861 at the age of 41. He was wounded in an unspecified battle. (Information from Confederate military records per National Archives Record Group 109, Conf. book-volume VIII., Jonas and Ann's ages and birthplace per 1850 Macon County, NC census p. 348)

The original marriage bond for Dock and Mary (Polly Mae) is on file in the Macon County Courthouse and is an interesting document. For example, the bond was for "five hundred pounds current money of the State" and Mary's surname is spelled NICHELS. The bondsman was a Michael Jenkins. Ordinarily Jonas would have been the bondsman, but since he opposed the marriage, soneone else had to sigh the bond. As bondsmen usually were close relatives, it is possible this Michael Jenkins may have been one of the unidentified sons of Jonas and Ann Williams Jenkins, a half-brother to Charles, but it is just speculation, nothing proved yet.

The story goes that Jonas was very upset about the pending marriage and moved into North Georgia for a while. According to the booklet written, the reason Jonas so upset was because Polly Mae was the daughter of Charles' half sister - Nancy Jenkins - who was married to Alexander Nichols. Jonas apparently got over his "fit" because the September 13, 1850 census for Macon County, NC - Smokey Mountain Township shows Charles and Mary, Jonas and Polly living in the same house.

The Arlington Church Cemetery was originally the Charles "Dock" Jenkins Family Cemetery. The land is part of an original grant made to Jonas Jenkins when he first settled in the Jenkins Branch area. After Jonas' death the land passed to Dock. He set aside the land by deed for the continued use as a cemetery by all the members of his family before his own death in 1915. Dock took great care in the layout of his cemetery. He established a very orderly pattern with straight rows and uniform spacing between the graves. He took extra care to mark the exact location of each grave. Until the latter half of the twentieth century, the majority of the burials in this cemetery were of people directly descended from Dock and Polly Jenkins.

The earliest tombstone erected in the cemetery is a dual stone for Silas and Eliza Jenkins. The stone was erected after May 1857.

Sadly, only Nancy Jane and Sarah Josephine outlived their parents. Birth dates and names per 1880, Swain County, North Carolina Census - also Dock, Polly, Thomas, Robert, Charles, Caladona and her husband. Nancy Jane and her husband, & Silas and Eliza are buried at the Arlington Cemetery. The stones and inscriptions on all but Silas and Eliza were personally verified by Joan Gillett.

Census for 1850 in Macon County, North Carlolina shows Jonas & Polly as parents.

More About CHARLES (DOCK) JENKINS:

Burial: 23 January 1915, Arlington Height, Swain County, North Carolina, Dock Jenkins Family Cemetery

More About MARY (MAE) POLLY NICHOLS:

Burial: 11 December 1909, Arlington Height, Swain County, North Carolina, Dock Jenkins Family Cemetery

Children of CHARLES JENKINS and MARY NICHOLS are:

i. SILAS5 JENKINS, b. 19 June 1851; d. 26 June 1851.

Notes for SILAS JENKINS:

First born child and died 7 days after being born. He shares a dual headstone with his sister Eliza.

ii. CAROLINE (CALLIE) JENKINS, b. 29 July 1852; d. 4 December 1907; m. RUBEN WESLEY ELLIOTT, 4 January 1876, Swain County, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1850.

Notes for CAROLINE (CALLIE) JENKINS:

R. W. Elliott, 26 of Swain County, to Caroline Jenkins, 23, of Swain County, 4 January 1876, by M. T. Batle. Witnesses: J. A. Green, H. T. Jenkins, and W. W. A. Burchfield.

iii. NANCY JANE (SISSY) JENKINS, b. 20 August 1854, Swain County, North Carolina; d. 17 October 1934, Swain County, North Carolina; m. WILLIAM ALEXANDER BURCHFIELD, 24 March 1871, Macon County, North Carolina; b. 24 March 1850; d. 14 April 1927, Swain County, North Carolina.

Notes for NANCY JANE (SISSY) JENKINS:

Del Burchfield, writing in the Heritage of Swain County, 1988, Article 62, gives a glowing report on the lives of Bill and Sissy Burchfield. She writes that Bill was a meek man, active in community affairs and the two, Bill and Sissy contributed much to the spread of Christianity in the area. Sissy was active in caring for the sick with the use of herbs, and assisting in the delivery of babies. They lived in Swain County all their lives.

Apparently, the Burchfields were early settlers along the Jenkins Branch and the Tuckasegee River as well as the Jonas Jenkins, Sr. famly. Bill and Sissy Burchfield married young and settled on 100 acres of land which may have been given them by her father, Charles "Dock" Jenkins, whose father was Jonas Jenkins, Sr. His Mother was Jennie Brickey a mistress to Jonas Jenkins, Sr.

More About NANCY JANE (SISSY) JENKINS:

Burial: 20 October 1934, Swain County, North Carolina, Arlington Height, Dock Jenkins Family Cemetery

More About WILLIAM ALEXANDER BURCHFIELD:

Burial: 17 April 1927, Swain County, North Carolina, Arlington Height, Dock Jenkins Family Cemetery

iv. SARAH JOSEPHINE "JO" JENKINS, b. 28 November 1854, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina; d. 19 March 1944, Towns County, Georgia; m. ISAAC DECATOR JENKINS; b. Abt. 1858, Swain County, North Carolina; d. Aft. 1885, Arizona.

More About SARAH JOSEPHINE "JO" JENKINS:

Burial: Towns County, Georgia, Old Brasstown Baptist Cemetery

v. ELIZA JENKINS, b. 20 December 1856; d. 27 May 1857.

vi. ZENOBIA CALDONIA JENKINS, b. 2 July 1858; d. 1 May 1908; m. WILLIAM PICKNEY LAFEYETTE (FATE) SHOOK, 24 December 1882, Swain County, North Carolina; b. October 1861; d. 1934.

vii. LAURA PALESTINE JENKINS, b. 4 February 1861, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. 8 July 1907, Judson, Swain County, North Carolina; m. (1) ELIAS (SKIMP) BRENDLE JENKINS, 13 January 1882, Charleston Township, Swain County, North Carolina; b. 16 January 1860, Judson, Swain County, North Carolina; d. 8 February 1924, Nantahala Township, Swain County, North Carolina; m. (2) JOSEPH D. BRIDGES, 11 September 1900.

More About LAURA PALESTINE JENKINS:

Burial: Swain County, North Carolina, Ashe Cemetery

More About ELIAS (SKIMP) BRENDLE JENKINS:

Burial: Round Hill, Swain County, North Carolina, Ashe Cemetery

viii. SARAH JOSEPHINE JENKINS, b. 24 November 1864; m. (1) JOHN KEYS; m. (2) ISAAC D. JENKINS; b. Abt. 1850; m. (3) MURPHY LEE FULLER, SR., 21 December 1886, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina.

ix. GEORGE W. JENKINS, b. 18 July 1865; m. MARY BURNS.

x. THOMAS A. JENKINS, b. 19 October 1867; d. 11 November 1883; m. NEVER MARRIED.

xi. ROBERT LEE JENKINS, b. 15 February 1871; d. 25 February 1906; m. MAY LARENT CUNNINGHAM, 29 December 1895.

xii. M. PARAZADA (PET) JENKINS, b. 8 March 1874; d. 1904; m. GEORGE MASHBURN; b. February 1876.

xiii. CHARLES F. JENKINS, b. 25 August 1880; d. 28 February 1903; m. NEVER MARRIED.

 

6. PETER ANDREW4 JENKINS (JONAS TOLIVER3, SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 13 January 1828 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died 12 December 1912 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He married JUDITH ANNA BRENDLE 20 March 1848 in Macon County, North Carolina, daughter of JOHN BRENDLE and CHARLOTTE WILLIAMS. She was born 20 March 1830 in North Carolina, and died 29 April 1924 in Swain County, North Carolina.

Notes for PETER ANDREW JENKINS:

Peter Jenkins, age 33, was a farmer and Head of the Household in Jackson County, North Carolina in 1860 Census. Witness of the Marriage contract for Peter and Judity was William C. Nicholes.

Children of PETER JENKINS and JUDITH BRENDLE are:

i. JOHN D.5 JENKINS, b. 11 May 1849, Macon County, North Carolina; d. 3 August 1918, Swain County, North Carolina; m. (1) SUSAN HYDE, Bef. 1896; m. (2) L. JOSEPHINE NATIONS CLAMPETT, 26 March 1896, Swain County, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1862.

ii. HENRY TAYLOR JENKINS, b. 29 February 1852, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina; d. 2 April 1931, Swain County, North Carolina; m. (1) UNKNOWN; m. (2) NANCY LOUISE BURNS, 21 April 1878, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina; b. 5 July 1856, Deys Creek, Swain County, North Carolina; d. 25 October 1950, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina.

Marriage Notes for HENRY JENKINS and NANCY BURNS:

Married by Matt Taylor, Register of deeds. Jake Elliot's mother and father were witnesses.

iii. ELIZABETH (BETSY) ANN JENKINS, b. 27 September 1856, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. 26 January 1933, Swain County, North Carolina; m. HENRY FRANKLIN, 15 January 1880, Swain County, North Carolina.

iv. NANCY H. JENKINS, b. Abt. 1863.

v. THOMAS WATTS JENKINS, b. 18 June 1864, Jackson County, North Carolina; m. SARAH JANE CAMPBELL.

vi. GEORGE ANDREW WASHINGTON JENKINS, b. 18 June 1864, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. 23 February 1941, North Carolina; m. (1) MARY BURNS, 11 July 1885; m. (2) CORA LEE SHULER, 14 August 1902, Swain County, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1884.

vii. ELIZA J. JENKINS, b. Abt. 1868.

viii. KELLIE SELMA JENKINS, b. 1868; m. ELIJAH OLIVER, 26 February 1885, Swain County, North Carolina.

ix. CALDONIA JENKINS, b. 16 November 1868, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. 21 July 1914, Swain County, North Carolina; m. ELIJAH OLIVER.

x. OLIVIA JENKINS, b. Aft. 1868; d. 1886; m. NEVER MARRIED.

Notes for OLIVIA JENKINS:

Drowned in Alarka Creek, Alarka, North Carolina in 1886.

 

7. NATHAN4 JENKINS (JONAS TOLIVER3, SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 1793 in Tennessee, and died Aft. 1860 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married (1) SARAH Bef. 1824. He married (2) MARY NANCY ABBOTT 1 February 1824 in Haywood County, North Carolina. She died Bef. 1850.

Notes for NATHAN JENKINS:

He was a school teacher. They settled on Deep Creek at Jenkins Place, Swain County, North Carolina.

Nathan is listed in the Federal Census of September 13, 1850 as 51 years old and a teacher. No wife was listed (she may have been dead), but six children were listed: John, age 25; Silas, age 19; Jonas, age 16; Jane, age 15; Nancy, age 12; William, age 8; and Thomas, age 6. The first three children were listed s born in Haywood County, North Carolina and the last three were born in Macon County, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY NANCY ABBOTT:

I am uncertain about Nancy as the wife of Nathan Jenkins. In the 1850 Census for Macon County, North Carolina, there was no wife listed for Nathan Jenkins.

Children of NATHAN JENKINS and MARY ABBOTT are:

i. JOHN5 JENKINS, b. 1825, Haywood County, North Carolina; m. CINTHIA (CINDA) WATKINS, 18 March 1853, Haywood County, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1825.

Notes for JOHN JENKINS:

According to 1850 & 1880 census records, John was deformed. He was a shoemaker. John and his family lived in Jackson County, North Carolina. Census for September 13, 1850 showed him as 25 years old.

ii. WINNCE JENKINS, b. 1827, Haywood County, North Carolina.

iii. MARY (POLLY) JENKINS, b. 1 October 1828, Haywood County, North Carolina; m. ELISHA GIBBY, 30 August 1912, Haywood County, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY (POLLY) JENKINS:

In the 1850 Census for Macon County, North Carolina she is 19 years old.

iv. SILAS JENKINS, b. 1831, Haywood County, North Carolina.

v. JONAS JENKINS, b. 1834, Haywood County, North Carolina; m. NANCY R. WARD.

Notes for JONAS JENKINS:

Jonas served in the Confederate Army as a Sergeant in Company F, (69 NC Troops), Thomas Legion. In the 1850 census for Macon County, North Carolina he was listed as 16 years old.

vi. JANE JENKINS, b. 1835, Haywood County, North Carolina.

Notes for JANE JENKINS:

In the 1850 census for Macon County, North Carolina she is listed as 15 years old.

vii. NANCY C. JENKINS, b. 11 June 1838, Deercreek Township, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. 6 November 1926, Swain County, North Carolina; m. (1) WILLIAM BUTLER GARRETT; b. 10 February 1824, Mecklenburg, North Carolina; d. 14 April 1876, Cherokee, Jackson County, North Carolina; m. (2) UNKNOWN.

Notes for NANCY C. JENKINS:

In the 1850 census for Macon County, North Carolina she is listed as 12 years old.

More About NANCY C. JENKINS:

Burial: Swain County, North Carolina, Watkins Cemetery

Notes for WILLIAM BUTLER GARRETT:

William B. Garrett and group were involved in the death of Uriah Charles Burns in 1862. (The Bone Rattler, Vol 2, No 4, p 78-79)

More About WILLIAM BUTLER GARRETT:

Burial: Swain County, North Carolina, Thompson Cemetery

viii. WILLIAM H. JENKINS, b. 1842, Macon County, North Carolina.

Notes for WILLIAM H. JENKINS:

In the 1850 census for Macon County, North Carolina he is listed as 8 years old.

ix. THOMAS JENKINS, b. 1844, Macon County, North Carolina.

Notes for THOMAS JENKINS:

In the 1850 census for Macon County, North Carolina he is listed as 6 years old.

 

8. JONAS TOLIVER4 JENKINS, JR. (JONAS TOLIVER3, SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 1803 in East Tennessee, and died 17 April 1871 in Cherokee County, North Carolina. He married (1) JULIET ANN (JULIA ANN) BURKHOLDER 27 July 1821 in Shenandoah County, Virginia, daughter of FREDERICK BURKHOLDER. She was born 1804 in Shenandoah County, Virginia, and died 1840 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He married (2) RACHEL HYDE 19 October 1840 in Macon County, North Carolina, daughter of BENJAMIN HYDE and ELIZABETH LEATHERWOOD. She was born 14 February 1815 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died 7 December 1896 in Graham County, North Carolina.

Notes for JONAS TOLIVER JENKINS, JR.:

Jonas Jenkins, son of Jonas and Polly Ann (Williams) Jenkins, was born in 1803 in East Tennessee. Near 1820 his parents returned to the Shenandoah County, Virginia where Jonas married on July 27, 1821, Juliet Burkholder, daughter of Fredric Burkholder. Within the year, Jonas and Juliet Jenkins migrated with his father's family to Haywood County, North Carolina and settled at Soco Creek.

In 1832 Jonas, Jr. was granted by patent 25 acres on Soco Creek, and another 50 on its tributary, Swearing Jim Mill Creek (now Jenkins Creek). Afterwards he purchased an additional 100 acre tract on the latter creek, which was bounded on one side by the Indian line, and situated two miles west of Quallatown, where remained scores of Cherokee families.

After the 1835 Treaty of New Echota was made to remove the Cherokee Nation three years later to Arkansas, Jonas Jr. sold his lands on Soco Creek to William H. Thomas for the Qualla Cherokees. After selling his tracts in 1837 and 1838, he removed with his father and brothers to settle along the south bank of the Tuckasegee River at the present Jenkins Banch.

During the Cherokee removal, the state raised a militia to assist the federal army, and Jonas Jenkins enlisted in Captain Angel's Company, 3rd Regiment, North Carolina Militia. He was mustered in to service at Franklin on May 1, 1838; and upon virtual completion of removal within the state, was mustered out of service with the discharge of all militia volunteers on the following July 16. On November 1 of that year, Tsali (who has since become legendary) and his fugitive band, attacked a detachment of soldiers who had apprehended them. On November 15, Jonas was engaged to participate in the band's capture. Five years later he testified he had been an eyewitness to Tsali's execution, and left in the form of a deposition, and informative account of what has become a dramatized incident.

Julie Burkholder Jenkins died in the summer of 1840 after delivering the last child Isaac. The boy was adopted by Isaac and Jane Sellers and reared in Gilmer County, Georgia. On October 9 1840, in Macon County, North Carolina, Jonas married Rachel Hyde, a woman said to be compassionate and industrious.

In 1844, Jonas Jenkins and his family resettled on the frontier lost by the Cherokee Nation and established a farm on a 100 acre tract granted him in Cherokee (now Graham County, NC) County near the Little Tennessee River at Tuskeegee. Like his Scotch-Irish father, Jonas was red-haired and blue eyed, and is said to have had a volatile temper. He died on April 17, 1871 at age 67, and is buried at the Guge Cemetery. "To die is gain" was engraved on his stone. (from a file by Shirley Rogers that was placed on World Connect, and from a book "Appalachian Pioneers" by Gary Claude Jenkins, 1983)

 

4th Board Claim 251, RG 75:

Record of the Bureau of Indian Affairs

National Archives

State of North Carolina} This day personally came before me, Joseph Welch, one of the acting

Macon County } Justices of the peace in and for said county, Jonas Jenkins, aged forty one years, a

respectable citizen of said county who, after sworn according to law, deposeth and saith as follows:

That about the fifteenth of November 1838, he was employed to accompany Euchella and about forty Cherokee warriors that had been employed by Colonel Foster of the United States Army to aid in capturing Charley and three other Cherokee Indians that had as he was informed murdered two soldiers by the names of Perry and Martin belonging to the 4th Infantry a short time previous to the time he entered the service. After the Cherokee company and the few white hunters that accompanied them captured three of the murderers, deponent aided to guard them to where Colonel Foster was, then stationed with the United States troops near the mouth of the Tuckasegee River on the Little Tennessee River in the above mentioned county. A few days afterwards the murderers were tried by the Cherokees, found guilty (as deponent as informed) and deponent was present when they were shot by a guard of the Cherokees under the direction of Euchella in the presence of Colonel Foster and the United States Army which was drawn up on the bank of the Little Tennessee River to see them executed. Euchella and the chiefs and warriors that composed the company were directed to assemble at Colonel Foster's tent to hold a talk. Colonel Foster when they were assembled informed them that they had seen in the punishment of those murderers the consequence resulting from an attack on the United States Army and murdering citizens. He stated that he was aware of the important services they had rendered the United States in capturing and executing those murderers and that only one by the name of Charley remained to be captured and executed, he would leave them to perform that part of the duty and would immediately march his army out of the country and in consequence of the meritorious services rendered the United States by the Cherokee chiefs and warriors in performing the services he would close the emigration and permit Euchella and his band as well as all the Cherokees reeemaining in the country (except old Charley's family) to settle in and unite with the Cherokees at Qualla Town that had been citizenized. He advised them to send runners to bring in their friends that had been lying out in the mountains to avoid being taken to Arkansas to inform them of the permission granted them to settle at Qualla Town and become citizens of the state, advised them to say to their friends not to lie out in the mountains any longer suffering with hunger but to take his advise and settle at Qualla Town and not scatter off among the whites, to live in friendship with their white neighbors and make good citizens and he assured them that they would never be molested by the United States. Euchella replied before they were made citizens of the United States. that they had aided the white people in their war against the Creek Indians and now since the government of the United States had been so kind to them as to permit the Cherokees remaining to remain citizens of the state of North Carolina, they would always be found ready as American citizens to render their adoptedd country all the aid in their power against her enemies. Euchella and the other chiefs and warriors belonging to the company took leave of Colonel Foster and Euchella, informed him when his warriors had captured Charley that he should be dealt with as the chiefs had promised and though he might be in a foreign country when he heard from them, he should have no reason to accuse them for not performing on their part in good faith all they had promised him. The Cherokee company then marched up the Tuckasegee River towards Qualla Town and the American Army started towards Tennessee as deponent was informed, he did not wait to see them on their march but they were preparing to march when he left with the Cherokee company. The next day Wachucha and some other Cherokees met the Cherokee company with old Charley who they had captured on Nantahala and the next day afterwards Euchella and the chiefs tried him, he acknowledged he had killed the soldier and that he expected to die for it when he done the act. Euchella after the decision was made informed Charley that he would be shot at twelve o'clock. A short time before twelve he told Euchella to hunt up his children that had been left in the mountains when he was taken first to be emigrated, to be a father to them talk good to them, give them good advise, to tell them what had become of their father and that it was his request that they should die in that country and never go to Arkansas. He told them he was a brave man and not afraid to die and when he was chained to the tree to be shot he showed no symptom of fear. Euchella promised him what he requested in relation to his children should be performed, a bandage was place over his eyes and three of the warriors were selected to execute the sentence and at a signal given by Euchella with his hand, the three selected fired, one ball passed into his brain and two balls into his breast, deponent aided in digging his grave and burying him on the bank of the Tuckasegee River. The Cherokee company immediately marched on towards Qualla Town. A few days afterwards deponent was at that town and saw about thirty of the outlying Cherokees includinng men, women, and children almost naked move into the town to settle there in pursuance of the instructions given by Colonel Foster in permitting those Cherokee Indians to remain with the best arrangement that could have been made, that the interest of the government of the Cherokees and the white citizens were promoted thereby. Colonel Foster's whole regiment unaided by the Indians could not in his opinion have captured those murderers against this time. The large beds of laurel in which they had secreted themselves rendered it impossible for him to have taken them with his troops, deponent further saith, as sworn to and subscribed before me August 16, 1843.

Joseph Welch JP his

Jonas X Jenkins

mark

More About JONAS TOLIVER JENKINS, JR.:

Burial: Graham County, North Carolina, Guge Cemetery

More About RACHEL HYDE:

Burial: Graham County, North Carolina, Jenkins/Santeetlah Cemetery

Children of JONAS JENKINS and JULIET BURKHOLDER are:

i. JAMES H.5 JENKINS, m. MOLLIE ROSE, 16 December 1888, Graham County, North Carolina; b. 27 February 1866; d. 22 August 1944.

More About MOLLIE ROSE:

Burial: Graham County, North Carolina, Jenkins/Steoah Cemetery

ii. JOHN JENKINS, b. 17 December 1826, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. 14 September 1910; m. ELIZABETH SAWYER, 30 September 1847, Blount County, Tennessee; b. 1830, North Carolina.

More About JOHN JENKINS:

Burial: Graham County, North Carolina, Guge Cemetery

iii. CELIA (CELIE) JENKINS, b. Abt. 1829, Shenandoah County, Virginia; d. 14 February 1905, Page County, Virginia; m. JOHN DINGUS, JR., 5 February 1856, Page County, Virginia.

iv. ELIZABETH (BETTY) JENKINS, b. 16 August 1833, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. 3 January 1915, Page County, Virginia; m. JAMES WILLIAM TAZWELL HOUSDEN, 2 October 1884, Page County, Virginia; b. 1844, Page County, Virginia.

v. ABRAHAM JENKINS, b. Abt. 1835, Jackson, County, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1873, Cherokee County, North Carolina; m. SARAH JANE (SALLY) LOVIN, 1856, Cherokee County, North Carolina; b. 20 May 1836, Burke County, North Carolina; d. 30 September 1925, Graham County, North Carolina.

Notes for ABRAHAM JENKINS:

Abraham Jenkins was born in the Soco Valley of Haywood County in 1835. He was five years old when his mother died and his father remarried and brought the family to the new land of Cherokee County. He received the education offered in common school. Abram married at the age of 21, in l856, Sarah Jane Lovin in Cherokee County.

Sarah Lovin was born in Burke County on May 20, 1836; daughter of William Lovin,Jr. and Nancy Crisp Lovin. William was born in Burke County circa 1797 and married in the same on May 7, 1827. His wife, Nancy Crisp was the daughter of McCajah (son of John) and Polly (daughter of William) Sumter Crisp.

Abram and Sarah Jenkins developed a farm in the Cheoah Valley and were members of the Cheoah Baptist Church. In 1862 Confederate troops were raised from the region which would be known as Thomas' Legion. At Fort Montgovery (Robbinsville) on July 23, Abram was mustered into Company H, 69th North Carolina Infantry.

Mustered in along with Abram were his brothers William and Philip Jenkins and his brothers in law John and William Lovin. Company H with other companies in the Thomas Legion were stationed in northeast Tennessee during the first two years of service. Company H was assigned the task of guarding the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. In April of 1863, Abram's brother William Jenkins, deserted the Confederacy at Carter's Depot, Tennessee. Believing he was fighting for the wrong cause, William enlisted in the Federal Army; Company C, Third Tennessee Mounted Infantry. He lost the companionship of one brother, amazingly he found it from another. Stationed in East Tennessee, he met Isaac Taylor, his youngest full brother, who had been adopted into the Sellers family during his infancy. It was a joyous reunion of which Abram would often speak after the war.

Thomas' Legion was officially divided in April, l863 with Colonel William H. Thomas commanding two companies of Qualla Cherokees; and Colonel James Love commanding eight companies of highlanders. The major force of the Legion was stationed in East Tennessee and Virginia for the duration of the war. Back home, across the Great Smokies, Western North Carolina was left with little defense against tories and destructive raids from the Federal Army out of Knoxville.

In February, 1864, Abram was granted his ssecond leave of absense for thirty days. He returned in March to Carter's Depot. In April the station was attacked by the Federals, 2,000 strong. The Legion victoriously repulsed them, and gained for themselves considerableee reputation. In May the Legion was ordered to Saltville, Virginia, to help protect the vitally important salt works. Salt was important for food preservation. Meanwhile Federal troops were massing in the Shenandoah Valley in a determination to clear the way for cutting off the sources that supplied arms and food to General Robert Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel Love, hoping to return to North Carolina, received new orders and the Legion moved north to the Valley of Virginia.

On June 2, 1864, Thomas Legion arrived by rail in Staunton, being aware that a great battle was ahead. On June 4, Abram was issued new clothing. The Legion along with troops from East Tennessee joined the Virginia troops and marched to Piedmont, a hamlet one mile north of New Hope. 3,000 soldiers under the command of General "Grumble" Jones positioned a line facing north to the advance of Union General David Hunter. Hunter's army outnumbered the Confederates by more than two to one. In Jones' hurry to meet Hunnter, he gave the Federal Army a great advantage in position.

June 5, 1864, 9:00 a.m., the Battle of Piedmont commenced with scattered firing which in a moment was joined by the grape and canister of cannons. The temperature on this unusually hot Sunday morning soared and by noon the heat was almost unendurable. Hot sheets of lead rained over the battlefield. The ear-splintering roar of cannons continued for hours. Trees fell, fires ignited, still the Condederates held their position. At 2:00 p.m. they charged the Federals in a hand-to-hand contest, but they were outnumbered and returned to their defenses. General Hunter was on the verge of retreating when he observed a vast gap in the Confederate line. He ordered a fresh brigade through it and the stradegy suddenly threw the Confederates into a line of crossfire.

General Jones ordered the Sixtieth Virginia forward to aid Thomas' Legion. Then Jones was shot down. The Virginia infantry broke under the pressure and stampeded through the ranks of the Legion. In the end remained Thomas Legion defending itself from attack front and rear. As the Federals bore down upon the Legion, the line broke and the Confederates ran for the Middle River. Many were captured and taken prisoner. The fierce Battle of Piedmont was a Federal victory. Staunton fell into the enemy's hand creating an opening wedge into the Shenandoah Valley.

Abram Jenkins had fought gallantly. He held his position to the end when the Federals crashed through upon the Legion. He was one of many scooped up in capture. On June 8, he was taken to Staunton and placed under guard. On June 21, he arrived in Indianapolis, Indiana where he was incarcerated at Camp Morton.

Camp Morton was similar to most war prisons: An open compound surrounded on each side with a wall of timber where guards were perched overhead. Within the acres of these walls were the mess hall and infirmary. Inmates lived in overcrowded and disease infested tents. The mortality rate at Camp Morton was exceedingly high, calling for offiicial explanations. Malaria was rampant and caused the greatest number of deaths; followed by typhus, pneumonia, smallpox, and dysentery. Three days before Abram arrived, a prison revolt had been put down caused by a further shortening of rations. Daily life in the prison began at dawn when the inmates were summoned to attention for roll call. (Abram afterwards related this sometimes meant standing for hours in snow and on frozen ground while many prisoners had no shoes.) Breakfast followed which would usually be a piece of pork and slice of bread. Inmates were then allowed to idle away the long hours until the evening highlight which was another slice of bread and something called soup. And the day closed with taps.

On February 19, 1865, Abram Jenkins was paroled from Camp Morton and transfered for a prisoner exchange. He had endured the winter in Indiana without sufficient clothing and shelter. His health broke down with plural pneumonia-thus he was granted the exchange. Abram was transported to Camp Lookout in Baltimore, Maryland for release. From Baltimore, Abram arrived by rail in Richmond, Virginia on February 28, and admitted into the Receiving and Wayside Hospital (General Hospital # 9)

where he convalesced.

The war was over in Virginia in April. On May 12, Thomas' Legion was paroled in North Carolina. Sarah Jenkins had not seen her husband in more than a year. She was aware of the Legion's infantry having fought in the Battle of Piedmont. Many men had been killed. Some captured. Sarah did not know whether Abram was dead or alive. She could only worry and pray.

For Sarah the war had meant being alone facing hunger, privation, and terror. It was then her lot to provide food for her children. Planting and harvesting would have been difficult enough, but everywhere around livestock and crops were confiscated by the Confederate commissaries, plundered by outlaws and tories, and laid waste by Federal raids out of Knoxville.

Fear of hunger and molestation were continually with her. A terror unrelated to the war siezed Sarah one late evening when she was returning from a brief journey. Behind her in the distance she heard the scream of a panther. She quickened her pace through the woods and finally broke into a run as the cat howled again. She made it to the house and was shutting the door when she caught sight of the panther. Now the war was over and Sarah was bedridden with pneumonia. One afternoon she stared from her window when she saw Abra, approaching the house. She jumped from her bed and ran to meet him but collapsed near the front gate. Abram rushed to Sarah and carried her back into the house.

Abram Jenkins died in Tuskeegee, Graham (formerly Cherokee) County in 1873, age 37, from blood poisoning incurred by stepping on a nail. Sarah died September 30, 1925, age 89. He is buried at the Guge Cemetery in Tuskeegee. She is buried at the Brown Cemetery in Stecooah.

References: History of the Jenkins Family- Gary Claude Jenkins Library of Congress Catalogue Card

Number 82-094133 Copyright, l983

Military record per National Archives card No. 1994210309 and Vernon H. Crow, STORM IN THE MOUNTAINS (Cherokee Press, l982); N. C. Browder THE CHEROKEE INDIANS AND THOSE WHO CAME AFTER (N.C., 1974), pp 348, 381; Census N.C. Cherokee Co. 1870, p. 26.

vi. PATRICK JENKINS, b. 1837, Haywood County, North Carolina.

vii. ISAAC D. TAYLOR (IKE) JENKINS, b. 1839, Macon County, North Carolina; m. SUSIE JANE MYERS; b. Blount County, Tennessee.

Notes for ISAAC D. TAYLOR (IKE) JENKINS:

Adopted by a Taylor family from Georgia after Juliet Burkholder's death in 1840 when he was a year old. Ike and his wife, Susie, raised their family at Tuskegee, Stecoah area, Graham County, North Carolina.

More About ISAAC D. TAYLOR (IKE) JENKINS:

Burial: Graham County, North Carolina, Yellow Branch Cemetery

More About SUSIE JANE MYERS:

Burial: Graham County, North Carolina, Yellow Branch Cemetery

Children of JONAS JENKINS and RACHEL HYDE are:

viii. WILLIAM5 JENKINS, b. 1841, Macon County, North Carolina; d. 15 February 1916, Cherokee County, North Carolina.

ix. MARGARET JENKINS, b. 1843, Macon County, North Carolina.

x. CATHERINE JENKINS, b. 1845, Cherokee County, North Carolina.

xi. RACHEL DEANNE JENKINS, b. 10 April 1847, Cherokee County, North Carolina; d. 6 December 1935, Tuskeegee, North Carolina; m. SAMUEL L. CABLE, 14 March 1875.

xii. CYNTHIA ELMIRA JENKINS, b. 29 November 1848, Cherokee County, North Carolina; d. 6 December 1935, Graham County, North Carolina; m. SAMUEL LORENZO CABLE, 25 March 1875; b. Abt. 1853.

More About CYNTHIA ELMIRA JENKINS:

Burial: Graham County, North Carolina, Gouge Cemetery

xiii. JULIETTA JENKINS, b. 1856, Cherokee County, North Carolina.

xiv. PETER JENKINS, b. 1860, Cherokee County, North Carolina; m. (1) MARIAH SAWYER; m. (2) AMANDA BOWENS, Bef. 1899; m. (3) AMANDA KIRKLAND, 9 December 1899, Cherokee County, North Carolina.

 

9. JOHN S.4 JENKINS (JONAS TOLIVER3, SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 1805 in Tennessee, and died 1874 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married MARY (POLLY) CRISP 30 March 1825 in Haywood County, North Carolina. She was born 1807 in South Carolina, and died 1874 in North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN S. JENKINS:

He and his family lived on the Tuskegee River near Jenkins Branch.

Children of JOHN JENKINS and MARY CRISP are:

i. JONAS5 JENKINS, b. 1827; m. SUSANNAH DUNN.

ii. JAMES (JIM) JENKINS, b. 1829, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. 10 April 1863, During the Civil War, Strawberry Plains, Tennessee; m. MARGARET (BABE) LEQUIRE, Abt. 1857; b. 1835, North Carolina; d. 1872.

Notes for JAMES (JIM) JENKINS:

He died while serving in the Confederate Army as a corporal, Company F, Infantry, Thomas Legion. He died at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee Hospital. Febris Con Com.

More About JAMES (JIM) JENKINS:

Burial: Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee

More About MARGARET (BABE) LEQUIRE:

Burial: Swain County, North Carolina, near Blankenship Cemetery

iii. NANCY JENKINS, b. 1830, Haywood County, North Carolina; m. NEVER MARRIED.

Notes for NANCY JENKINS:

Nancy was mentally retarded.

iv. MITCHELL A. JENKINS, b. 1832, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. 12 May 1862, During the Civil War, Cumberland Gap, Tennessee; m. NANCY T. ROGERS; b. Bet. 1822 - 1827, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina.

Notes for MITCHELL A. JENKINS:

He appears on the 1850 census of Macon County, North Carolina at age 18 in the household of his parents John and Mary Jenkins who were both 45 years old.

He died of typhoid fever during the Civil War while serving with the Confederate Army at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. His was a private in Company F, 29th Regiment, North Carolina State Troops. He was buried in Tellico Plains, Tennessee where there are several "Mitchell O. Jenkins" buried. It is not known if one of them was our Mitchell A. Jenkins. The couple had five children of record. All five appear on the 1870 census of Alarka Township, Macon County, North Carolina. They were listed as living in the household of Eli and Nancy Collins. After his death, his widow, Nancy Rogers Jenkins married D. K. Collins of Bryson City, North Carolina.

More About MITCHELL A. JENKINS:

Burial: Abt. 13 May 1862, Tellico Plains, Sweetwater, Monroe County, Tennessee

Notes for NANCY T. ROGERS:

In researching the Nancy Rogers family line, I have not found enough information to identify her with certainty. First, on the 1850 census for Tennessee Valley District, Macon County, North Carolina, a Thomas Rogers, age 58 of Tennessee and Elizabeth his wife, age 48 of Buncombe County, North Carolina are listed. There are ten children in the household between the ages of 8 and 27. The second child was Nancy, age 24 and born in Haywood County, North Carolina.

Second, there is a David and Patsy Rogers, ages 60 and 58. Six children were listed - the fifth is Nancy, age 26. I haven't a clue which of the two Nancys above, if either, is the wife of Mitchell Jenkins.

Nancy Rogers remarried after the death of Mitchell A. Jenkins. It is believed by some that her second husband was Eli Collins. I have no documentation to this marriage and there were no children. There is a Nancy Collins, wife of Eli Collins with several Jenkins children listed on the 1870 census in Alarka Township, Macon County, North Carolina. This could be our Nancy T. Rogers Jenkins Collins. On this census she was listed as 48 or 43 - it was difficult to tell which. If 43, she would have been born in 1827, or if 48, she would have been born in 1822. Nancy was buried in an unmarked grave at the foot of her own daughter, Mary Susan Jenkins Welch, in the Tabor Cemetery, Brush Creek, Swain County, North Carolina, according to James Earl Douthit, great grandson of Nancy Rogers Jenkins (Collins?). I have not found the burial place of Eli Collins. (documented by Jim Welch, 9/2002)

More About NANCY T. ROGERS:

Burial: Brush Creek, Swain County, North Carolina, Tabor Cemetery

v. JEREMIAH JENKINS, b. 12 January 1833, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. 22 June 1900, Swain County, North Carolina; m. (1) SARAH MELVINA HYDE, Bef. 1859, North Carolina; b. 19 March 1840, Macon County, North Carolina; d. 29 March 1859, Swain County, North Carolina; m. (2) MARY ANN MICKEY, 27 July 1868, North Carolina; b. 30 September 1844, Lawrence County, Illinois; d. 26 January 1924, Swain County, North Carolina.

Notes for JEREMIAH JENKINS:

Jeremiah Jenkins, age 27, is listed on the roster of Company A, 16th Regiment North Carolina Troops. He enlisted at Webster on April 27, 1861. He served with the 16th regiment until October, 1862 when it was transferred to the infantry regiment of the Thomas Legion. The Thomas Legion was made up of native Cherokee Indians and white mountaineers from North Carolina and Tennessee. Their duty was to defend the mountain passes from East Tennessee into Western North Carolina.

This unit was the last unit in North Carolina to surrender at the end of the Civil War. There is a marker at White Sulphur Springs near Waynesville, North Carolina which indicates the spot on which the last shot of the Civil War was fired on May 8, 1865.

The following is from Jack Jay Jenkins, September, 2002:

Jeremiah Jenkins joined the 16th North Carolina Infantry CSA (Confederate Army) in 1861. At some point in the late fall of 1862 he went AWOL. He left North Carolina in September of 1863 and ended up in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1864. Yep - he eventually joined the 8th Indiana Infantry, Company K, USA (Union Army) in May of 1864. He was stationed in Louisiana and then his regiment was transferred to Virginia and he and Phil Sheridan ran up and down the Shenandoah Valley. He ended up in Georgia in 1865 where he was mustered out of the service. He was never wounded but did rupture himself while lifting a barrel, and eventually put in for a pension.

He went back to Indiana, married a girl from Illinois (Mary Ann (Polly) Mickey and started a family. About 1877 they began the trip back to North Carolina. They lived for a year in Knox County, Tennessee and then arrived back in Swain County, North Carolina by 1880 (He is in the 1880 census).

Mary Jenkins eventually served as Postmaster for the town of Fairfax for a number of years. Jeremiah died in 1900, two weeks after the census was taken.

More About JEREMIAH JENKINS:

Burial: Swain County, North Carolina

Notes for SARAH MELVINA HYDE:

My great grandfather Jeremiah Jenkins was married to Melvina Hyde, daughter of Benjamin Hyde. This would have taken place in (the present-day boundaries of) Swain County, North Carolina. According to a questionnaire dated August 4, 1898 in his pension records, Jeremiah stated he had married Melvina (no date given) and that she had died in the Bryson City, North Carolina area. Mary Jenkins, Jeremiah's widow, in her application for a widow's pension, dated May 20, 1901, stated that Jeremiah had Melvina Hyde and that she had died on March 29, 1859. (from Jack Jay Jenkins)

vi. SUSIE JENKINS, b. 1835.

vii. JOHN JENKINS, b. 1837, Haywood County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN JENKINS:

He served in the Confederate Army in Levi's Light Artillery Battery, Thomas Legion.

viii. MARY CAROLINE (POLLY) JENKINS, b. 2 October 1839, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. 21 March 1913, Swain County, North Carolina; m. NOAH JACKSON HOWARD, 4 November 1855, Swain County, North Carolina; b. 13 April 1835, Macon County, North Carolina; d. 5 April 1908, Macon County, North Carolina.

More About MARY CAROLINE (POLLY) JENKINS:

Burial: Swain County, North Carolina

ix. WILLIAM T. JENKINS, b. 1840, Haywood County, North Carolina; m. JULIA ANN MILLSAPS.

x. FRANCIS MARION JENKINS, b. 17 June 1845, Macon County, North Carolina; d. 28 July 1928, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina; m. RUTHA EVELYN HYDE, 5 May 1866, Swain County, North Carolina; b. 31 March 1848, Swain County, North Carolina; d. 27 May 1924, Cherokee County, North Carolina.

Notes for FRANCIS MARION JENKINS:

He enlisted in Company F, 29th Regiment, North Carolina Conferderate Army on 31 August 1861. He served as a private; deserted in June 1862; later served in Captain Levi's Light Artillery Battery, Thomas' Legion. Later in his life, Francis was murdered.

Maryville Index (Maryville, Tennessee) Wednesday April 10, 1878

Sheriff McReynolds brought from Knoxville last Friday Francis Marion Jenkins, who murdered one Crisp in Swain County, North Carolina. After the murder of Crisp, he escaped, but was apprehended in Knox County, Tennessee a few days ago. He is the cousin of Phillip Jenkins, who murdered J. J. Calhoun in the same county, whose murder was witnessed by several of our citizens.

Dr. Merrell Jenkins Riddle has a copy of Francis Marion's pension application stating: "Company F, Levi's Battery, Thomas' Legion. Francis Marion was a brother to Mitchell Jenkins, my great-grandfather. (from William R. Welch, 9/2002)

xi. SAMUEL WASHINGTON JENKINS, M.D., b. 19 March 1848, Bryson City, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. 19 January 1933, Bakewell, Hamilton County, Tennessee; m. (1) ELIZABETH (ELIZA) JANE ROSE, 6 May 1866, Bryson City, Jackson County, North Carolina; b. 24 January 1846, Ducktown, Polk County, Tennessee; d. 6 December 1899, Soddy, Hamilton County, Tennessee; m. (2) SALLIE ANN GOODE, 25 July 1901, Coulterville, Hamilton County, Tennessee; b. 19 July 1883, Tennessee; d. 27 June 1924, Chattanooga Sanitarium, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Notes for SAMUEL WASHINGTON JENKINS, M.D.:

Dr. Samuel Washington Jenkins was a physician in Hamilton County, Tennessee. He was a prisoner during the Civil War and was injured after his release from prison when his boat (The Sultana) blew up in the Mississippi River near Vicksburg. He fought on the Union side and was discharged as a Corporal.

Obituary for Dr. Samuel Washington Jenkins

January 20, 1933

Dr. S. W. Jenkins, 84, Dies At Bakewell

Union Veteran Fought in Tennessee Regiment - Was Medical Examiner

Dr. Samuel W. Jenkins, 84, died at his home in Bakewell yesterday morning after a long illness. Dr. Jenkins was born March 19, 1848, and was a Union veteran of the War Between the States, being a member of Company L, Third Tennessee regiment. He served for more than three years and was one of the 2,120 soldiers on the boat Sultana when it was destroyed during the war on the Mississippi river.

Dr. Jenkins was captured at Sulphur Trussel, Alabama, and was in prison for six months at Andersonville. He helped to build the pontoon bridge across the Tennessee river here during the war and was also in the Battle of Orchard Knob. He was a practicing physician for more than sixty years and was pension examiner for the Southern railroad under Dr. George Baxter and Dr. W. A. Applegate of Chattanooga.

Dr. Jenkins had lived in the section of Soddy and Bakewell for more than fifty years and was a charter member of the Masonic lodge of Soddy.

Dr. Jenkins is survived by seven sons, E. A., S. W.,Jr., and William, all of Soddy; Arthur of Emory Gap, Tennessee, and John, Eddie and Theodore Jenkins of Bakewell; nine daughters, Mrs. T. J. Welch, Red Bank; Mrs. Elizabeth Woods, Toledo, Ohio; Miss Grace Jenkins, Chattanooga; Mrs. Harry Sanders, Chattanooga; Mrs. Walter Constigan, Cincinnati, Ohio; Mrs. Jessie Ledford and Misses Glenna and Sallie Maude Jenkins, all of Bakewell, and Mrs. Crystal Minnis of North Carolina; also a large number of grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the Congregational church at Soddy, with the Reverend A. L. DeJarnette in charge, assisted by Reverend W. O. Peeples. Interment with be in Varner cemetery, with Hallett's in charge. The Masonic order will have charge of the services at the grave.

Article from Chattanooga Newspaper

January 21, 1933

Dr. Jenkins Death Recalls Sultana

Survived Ship Tragedy in Mississippi River

Paroled Union Soldiers Crowded on Board

Total of 1,338 Lost Lives

The death of Dr. Samuel W. Jenkins, survivor of the sinking of the Sultana, at his home in Bakewell Thursday, recalled to memories of a few old-timers the story of that ill-fated steamer whose destruction cost 1,338 lives. Dr. Jenkins was 84 and was spared in his youth to tell the tale of the Sultana.

The boat, loaded with 1,990 persons, including about 1,200 paroled Union soldiers, sank in the Mississippi river in April of 1865. Two nations - the United States of America and the Confederate States of America - were shaken by the stark horror of the disaster and yet chronicles of was scarcely mention it - if at all, the Associated Press reported.

There was nothing glamorous about the disaster - no brave men charging into cannon, no rebel yells and no waving flags. It was just death without the tinsel of romance. The steamer either blew up or turned over from weight of its passengers. Anyway its human cargo was thrown into the mad Mississippi and most of the men and women drowned.

Acts of congress and snatches of history in documents of the "war of rebellion" mention the disaster. The prisoners were paroled by the Confederates in the Vicksburg area and were loaded on boats to go home. The Sultana steamed up the river and 1,900 persons were loaded aboard. Some documents say there were protests against herding so many men on one little ship.

But she started north and up the river she went down. Experts examined pieces of her boiler and testified as to causes of the disaster. The men who would have known what happened were dead - victims of the river. The secretary of war ordered an investigation.

One record says a captain was responsible for the large number of passengers and another document places blame on another Union officer. There were court martials. An ensign from the U.S.S. Ironclad Essex testified Union soldiers at Fort Pickering fired on him and his crew when they sought to save drowning soldiers. Other authorities said the ensign's report was not true. There were charges and counter-charges, but somehow the story of the Sultana died down.

The funeral of Dr. Jenkins was held at the Soddy Congregational church yesterday. Dr. A. L. DeJarnette officiating, assisted by the Reverend W. O. Peeples. Interment was in Varner cemetery.

More About SAMUEL WASHINGTON JENKINS, M.D.:

Burial: 20 January 1933, Soddy, Hamilton County, Tennessee, Varner Cemetery

More About ELIZABETH (ELIZA) JANE ROSE:

Burial: Hot Water Cemetery, on Soddy/Daisy Mountain now Redden Cemetery

More About SALLIE ANN GOODE:

Burial: Soddy, Hamilton County, Tennessee, Varner Cemetery

 

10. NANCY4 JENKINS (JONAS TOLIVER3, SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 16 November 1814 in Tennessee, and died 1925. She married ALEXANDER NICHOLS.

Children of NANCY JENKINS and ALEXANDER NICHOLS are:

i. MARY (MAE) POLLY5 NICHOLS, b. 2 May 1834, North Carolina; d. 8 December 1909, Swain County, North Carolina; m. CHARLES (DOCK) JENKINS, 19 May 1850, Macon County, North Carolina; b. 16 May 1829, Macon County, North Carolina; d. 20 January 1915, Bryson City, Swain County, North Carolina.

More About MARY (MAE) POLLY NICHOLS:

Burial: 11 December 1909, Arlington Height, Swain County, North Carolina, Dock Jenkins Family Cemetery

Notes for CHARLES (DOCK) JENKINS:

Dock served during the Civil War in the Confederate Army, joining in 1861, Sgt. Company F, 29th Regiment, North Carolina. He enlisted August 31, 1861 at the age of 41. He was wounded in an unspecified battle. (Information from Confederate military records per National Archives Record Group 109, Conf. book-volume VIII., Jonas and Ann's ages and birthplace per 1850 Macon County, NC census p. 348)

The original marriage bond for Dock and Mary (Polly Mae) is on file in the Macon County Courthouse and is an interesting document. For example, the bond was for "five hundred pounds current money of the State" and Mary's surname is spelled NICHELS. The bondsman was a Michael Jenkins. Ordinarily Jonas would have been the bondsman, but since he opposed the marriage, soneone else had to sigh the bond. As bondsmen usually were close relatives, it is possible this Michael Jenkins may have been one of the unidentified sons of Jonas and Ann Williams Jenkins, a half-brother to Charles, but it is just speculation, nothing proved yet.

The story goes that Jonas was very upset about the pending marriage and moved into North Georgia for a while. According to the booklet written, the reason Jonas so upset was because Polly Mae was the daughter of Charles' half sister - Nancy Jenkins - who was married to Alexander Nichols. Jonas apparently got over his "fit" because the September 13, 1850 census for Macon County, NC - Smokey Mountain Township shows Charles and Mary, Jonas and Polly living in the same house.

The Arlington Church Cemetery was originally the Charles "Dock" Jenkins Family Cemetery. The land is part of an original grant made to Jonas Jenkins when he first settled in the Jenkins Branch area. After Jonas' death the land passed to Dock. He set aside the land by deed for the continued use as a cemetery by all the members of his family before his own death in 1915. Dock took great care in the layout of his cemetery. He established a very orderly pattern with straight rows and uniform spacing between the graves. He took extra care to mark the exact location of each grave. Until the latter half of the twentieth century, the majority of the burials in this cemetery were of people directly descended from Dock and Polly Jenkins.

The earliest tombstone erected in the cemetery is a dual stone for Silas and Eliza Jenkins. The stone was erected after May 1857.

Sadly, only Nancy Jane and Sarah Josephine outlived their parents. Birth dates and names per 1880, Swain County, North Carolina Census - also Dock, Polly, Thomas, Robert, Charles, Caladona and her husband. Nancy Jane and her husband, & Silas and Eliza are buried at the Arlington Cemetery. The stones and inscriptions on all but Silas and Eliza were personally verified by Joan Gillett.

Census for 1850 in Macon County, North Carlolina shows Jonas & Polly as parents.

More About CHARLES (DOCK) JENKINS:

Burial: 23 January 1915, Arlington Height, Swain County, North Carolina, Dock Jenkins Family Cemetery

ii. FANNY NICHOLS, b. Abt. 1836.

iii. JOHN A. NICHOLS, b. 16 February 1839; m. SARAH CURTIS.

iv. CHARLES NICHOLS, b. Abt. 1840.

v. THOMAS NICHOLS, b. Abt. 1843.

vi. BETSY NICHOLS, b. Abt. 1845.

vii. DAVID NICHOLS, b. Abt. 1847.

viii. SAMUEL NICHOLS, b. Abt. 1851, Rabun County, Georgia.

ix. HENRY MANUEL NICHOLS, b. 1854, Rabun County, Georgia.

x. NANCY A. NICHOLS, b. 1859, Rabun County, Georgia.

xi. ELIZA NICHOLS, b. 1860, Rabun County, Georgia.

 

11. MATILDA4 JENKINS (ENOCH K.3, SAMUAL2, JONAS1) was born 1811. She married WILLIAM HARRISON KNIGHT 5 October 1835.

Children of MATILDA JENKINS and WILLIAM KNIGHT are:

i. MARY ANN ELIZABETH5 KNIGHT, b. 1836, Page County, Virginia.

ii. JACKSON KNIGHT, b. 1837.

iii. JOHN KNIGHT, b. 5 September 1837, Page County, Virginia.

iv. LUCINDA KNIGHT, b. 1839.

v. ELLEN KNIGHT, b. 1839.

vi. ISABELLA KNIGHT, b. 1840, Page County, Virginia; m. JOSEPH THOMAS PAINTER, 27 December 1860; b. 1839.

vii. ANDREW KNIGHT, b. 1841.

viii. JACOB FRANKLIN KNIGHT, b. 10 June 1842, Page County, Virginia.

ix. JAMES A. KNIGHT, b. June 1843, Page County, Virginia.

x. POLLY A. KNIGHT, b. 1847.

xi. GEORGE W. KNIGHT, b. 18 July 1849, Page County, Virginia.

xii. WILLIAM KNIGHT, b. 1852.

xiii. CHARLES WILLIAM KNIGHT, b. 30 December 1852, Page County, Virginia.

xiv. JOSEPH D. KNIGHT, b. 5 June 1854, Stoney Run, Page County, Virginia.

xv. FRANCES J. KNIGHT, b. 1855.

xvi. HENRIETTA KNIGHT, b. 15 July 1856, Page County, Virginia.

xvii. MARIA S. KNIGHT, b. 2 June 1858, Piney Woods, Stanley, Page County, Virginia.